About the Port

Our Local Commitment

Commercial building under contruction

Port of Benton is committed to developing locally-grown businesses, recruiting industrial and commercial companies, collaborating with partners to create economic prosperity in the region and maintaining multi-modal transportation networks. The Port has a diverse economic-development focus ranging from agribusiness, transportation, high-tech research and development to manufacturing.

We are one of only a few Nuclear Ports in the nation, which authorizes us to handle nuclear waste, spent fuel and other radioactive materials.

The Port was established in 1958 as a special-purpose district under Washington state statute RCW 53.

Port of Benton’s District Encompasses Two-Thirds of Benton County, Including North Richland, Benton City and Prosser

Helping Grow the Economy

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Direct Jobs
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Total Assets
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Port District

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Airports

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Short-Line Rail

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of Waterfront

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Barge Slip

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High Dock

Washington State Port
Fast Facts

There are 75 public ports in Washington state
Washington has the largest locally controlled port system in the world
42 ports operate industrial areas
41 ports operate recreational piers, marinas and docks
31 ports operate airports
16 ports operate marine terminals
In 2007, one in three jobs in Washington was related to trade
Washington is among the top exporting states in the United States, after California and Texas
Together, the Ports of Seattle and Tacoma are the third largest container load center in North America
About one-third of U.S. grain exports move in the Columbia-Snake River system to world markets
Washington constitutes only 2% of U.S. population yet handles 7% of U.S. exports and 6% of the nation’s imports
Foreign exports directly and indirectly account for an estimated 25% of Washington’s Gross State product
Fast Facts Courtesy of
Washington Public Ports Association

Washington State Ports

Freight ship parked at loading docks

Public ports in Washington were authorized under the Port District Act of 1911. Each of Washington’s 75 ports was formed by a vote of the people and governed by publicly-elected, local officials.

Washington Port Districts are unique special purpose districts with the primary mission of promoting economic development.

Ports can build and operate commercial and general aviation airports, marine terminals, marinas, railroads and industrial parks. In addition, ports can lease public property for commercial activities, create public amenities to provide recreational opportunities and stimulate tourism. Ports are also involved in substantial environmental restoration projects, cleaning up polluted properties from the industries of generations past.

Get to know the ports in and around your community. Learn how they are benefiting the local economy through planning and building projects, infrastructure development and direct and indirect job creation.